Birth Injury Guide https://www.birthinjuryguide.org A comprehensive resource for families coping with birth trauma Thu, 12 Apr 2018 21:31:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 What is CranioSacral Therapy and Can it Contribute to Better Birth? https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/04/craniosacral-therapy-can-contribute-better-birth/ Thu, 12 Apr 2018 21:31:48 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=14936 Pregnancy, labor, and delivery are miraculous processes that highlight the power of a woman’s body.  However, these processes can also be difficult, painful, and complicated, which is why in light of recent research, we are asking – “What is CranioSacral …

The post What is CranioSacral Therapy and Can it Contribute to Better Birth? appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
Pregnancy, labor, and delivery are miraculous processes that highlight the power of a woman’s body.  However, these processes can also be difficult, painful, and complicated, which is why in light of recent research, we are asking – “What is CranioSacral Therapy and Can it Contribute to Better Birth?” This article will explore research on one of the latest strategies aimed at providing healthier and safer pregnancies and deliveries, which is CranioSacral Therapy.

What is CranioSacral Therapy?

CranioSacral Therapy (CST) is a form of massage that releases tension, relieves pain, and stimulates the immune system.  Using gentle pressure, the therapist gradually releases tension in the soft tissues around the central nervous system.  Much of the body’s functions are guided by the central nervous system, of which the craniosacral system is a large part.  The fluid and membranes surrounding the spinal cord and brain are a critical part of overall health.

CST works by releasing stress and tension in the membranes and tissue surrounding the craniosacral system, which promotes the body’s natural healing ability and immune system response.  Craniosacral therapy is said to reduce the need for more invasive techniques during the prenatal period, and researchers are highly supportive of CST as an integration into mainstream labor and delivery practices.

As birth injury attorneys, we want to keep our readers informed about emerging strategies to improve birth experiences and reduce the risk of injury.  If you have questions about birth injuries, contact our office today.

Can Craniosacral Therapy Contribute to Better Births?

During pregnancy and delivery, a woman’s body goes through a variety of changes, and in many ways, is in constant communication with the infant.  A woman’s body often “knows” what to do, but the stress and strain of delivery complicate the process.  CST is now being viewed as a means of helping a mother prepare for labor and delivery physically and mentally.

During pregnancy and delivery, CST can help relieve pain, lower stress, and create a more positive experience for mother and child.  Researchers have also noted the following:

  • CST has successfully been used in place of Pitocin to augment or start delivery.
  • Mothers receiving CST have been shown to progress through the first stage of labor without prolonged labor.
  • Infants whose mother’s received an epidural and CST showed no negative effects from the epidural.
  • No infants born to mother’s receiving CST required resuscitative efforts.
  • Mother’s receiving CST report faster healing and better adjustment compared to women who did not receive CST.
  • Women who received CST reported breastfeeding was accomplished more easily.
  • Use of CST produces consistent results across studies.

CranioSacral Therapy for the Postpartum Period

Not only does CST appear to aid in better pregnancies and birth experiences, but research shows that some CST methods are also applicable and helpful during the postpartum period.  Consider the following:

  • Using CST during pregnancy and/or delivery can make changes on a cellular level that will carry over into the postpartum period.
  • One technique that can be considered CST is that of “Kangaroo Care” or the skin-to-skin bonding that many hospitals encourage, especially in NICU’s.
  • CST can be useful in helping infants latch on during breastfeeding.
  • CST has been shown to help relieve tension and compression caused by posture changes during pregnancy.
  • CST for the mother has been shown to:
    • Reduce fatigue
    • Improve energy
    • Decrease stress
    • Decrease pain and inflammation
    • Increase confidence
    • Improve postpartum depression

In addition to these promising elements of CST, there are currently ongoing studies examining the impact of CST on postpartum post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).  While research already shows a positive correlation between CST and improved pregnancy and delivery outcomes, researchers note that more information and study is still needed.  Any sort of “alternative” or “non-traditional” method in a healthcare setting requires a great deal of study before being integrated.  For many expectant parents, however, CST may be the key to unlocking a safe, positive, and healthy pregnancy and delivery experience.

Could CranioSacral Therapy Reduce Birth Injuries?

There are many reasons why birth injuries occur.  Some injuries are caused by medical conditions impacting the mother or child.  Other injuries are caused by negligent actions on the part of a healthcare provider.  There is certainly some promise for CST reducing the risk of birth injuries caused by medical conditions impacting the mother.  By promoting the body’s healing response and supporting the immune system, pregnant mothers are better able to manage the natural stress caused by pregnancy.

As for birth injuries caused by negligence, it is doubtful that CST could reduce the risk of these injuries.  It may be helpful in treating birth injuries after-the-fact, but injuries caused by negligence are the result of an individual’s poor decision-making or mistakes.  Unfortunately, negligence is a risk that cannot be easily mitigated due to the nature of human beings.

If you have been impacted by a birth injury, you may find it beneficial to contact your healthcare provider about CST as a possible treatment.  If the injuries were caused by negligence, you may also find it helpful to contact Brown & Brothers to discuss your legal rights.  Learn more about birth injuries and what options you may have to pursue financial compensation by filling out our online form to schedule a free case review.

 

The post What is CranioSacral Therapy and Can it Contribute to Better Birth? appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
Can Brachial Plexus Birth Injuries Increase Risk of Mental Illness? https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/04/brachial-plexus-birth-injuries-increase-risk-mental-illness/ Wed, 04 Apr 2018 20:36:23 +0000 http://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=14883 Brachial plexus injuries are one of the most common birth injuries sustained during labor and delivery.  Now, researchers are exploring the longer term impact of brachial plexus injuries and are seeking to address the question – “Can Brachial Plexus Birth …

The post Can Brachial Plexus Birth Injuries Increase Risk of Mental Illness? appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
Brachial plexus injuries are one of the most common birth injuries sustained during labor and delivery.  Now, researchers are exploring the longer term impact of brachial plexus injuries and are seeking to address the question – “Can Brachial Plexus Birth Injuries Increase Risk of Mental Illness?”

Read on to learn more about the research, and what it could mean for you if your child has suffered a brachial plexus injury.  If you have questions about birth injuries and your legal rights, contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our birth injury attorneys about your situation.

Can Brachial Plexus Birth Injuries Increase Risk of Mental Illness?

A brachial plexus injury is an injury that damages the nerves in the spine, neck, shoulder, arm, or hand of the child.  While many birth injuries, including brachial plexus injuries, leave little or no long term effects, Swedish researchers have found that children who have experienced a brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) have a higher risk of developing mental health issues in their teenage years.

The research, published in PsychCentral, studied over 600,000 Swedish children.  Researchers found that children who suffered a BPBI used anti-depressants or were being treated for mental health issues more frequently than children without a BPBI.

Researchers discovered the following:

  • Of the 600,000 children studied, 1,600 had BPBI and were being treated for mental illness.
  • Children with BPBI who lived in low-income houses were more likely to develop mental illness than children in wealthier communities.
  • Teenage girls were more likely to be affected by mental illness following a BPBI than boys.
  • Overall, teenage girls with low socioeconomic status were more than twice as likely to develop mental illness than boys in higher socioeconomic situations.

Other studies have similarly shown a disproportion between boys and girls when it comes to the risk of developing mental illness, aside from BPBI.  There is also a link between socioeconomic status and the risk of developing mental health issues, according to some studies.

Why Are Brachial Plexus Birth Injuries and Mental Illness Linked?

Brachial plexus birth injuries most commonly affect only the nerves and flexibility in the child’s shoulder and arm.  However, tearing of the nerves can result in permanent damage, including lost range of motion, or a complete loss of use of the affected limb.  Children experiencing the difficulties of managing a permanent injury may be at a greater risk of developing mental health issues due to:

  • Ongoing treatment and therapy
  • Financial burdens for their families
  • Parental stress and mental health
  • Difficulties with psychosocial development

There are many factors that may contribute to why children with BPBI are more likely to experience mental health issues.  There are also a number of contributory factors, such as:

  • Low socioeconomic status
  • Lack of health insurance or care
  • Inadequate support for psychosocial development
  • Inability to manage emotions

Researchers are hopeful that studies like this one will highlight some of these factors and help healthcare providers make wise decisions when managing treatment both in the short- and long-term.  Researchers also hope that this information will help expectant parents make better informed decisions about how to manage labor and delivery, look for possible red flags, and be active participants in the decision-making process.

Highlighting the Importance of Long-Term Care after Birth Injuries

After a birth injury, of course, your first priority is getting immediate treatment for your child.  It is also important, however, to consider what longer term affects a birth injury could have on your family.  It is sometimes difficult to look past the physical element of a birth injury and consider long-term impacts, such as mental health.  It is, nonetheless, an important part of your child’s overall wellbeing.  As researchers noted:

A better understanding of the developmental environments of children affected by chronic handicap in early life is thus essential for preventing the spiral of decline in mental health for the child, moderating the suffering of affected children and their families“.

The prognosis for most children with BPBI is positive from a physical standpoint.  The severity of the injury and any comorbid conditions will have a tremendous impact on how treatment is managed, and what you can expect for your child in the months and years following the injury.  Now, thanks to research like that discussed above, parents can gain a better understanding of how to help children with BPBI in a more comprehensive manner.

Getting Support after a Brachial Plexus Injury

Like your child, the impact of a BPBI is unique.  There is no one-size-fits-all approach to managing the aftermath of a birth injury.  If you need support or guidance about birth injuries, contact Brown & Brothers for an individualized case review.  Our birth injury attorneys understand the uniqueness of each case, and takes a personalized approach to helping your family.

Whether you have questions about birth injuries, need help finding financial support, or are considering filing a medical malpractice claim, Brown & Brothers is here for you.  To get started, schedule a free case review by filling out our online form.

The post Can Brachial Plexus Birth Injuries Increase Risk of Mental Illness? appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
Can Large Head Circumference Predict Brain Damage or Cerebral Palsy? https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/03/can-large-head-circumference-predict-brain-damage-cerebral-palsy/ Wed, 28 Mar 2018 00:22:28 +0000 http://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=14820 When you have a baby, you will notice that his or her head circumference is measured routinely – generally until they reach toddler age.  Head circumference has always been an important part of documenting your child’s overall health, but new …

The post Can Large Head Circumference Predict Brain Damage or Cerebral Palsy? appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
When you have a baby, you will notice that his or her head circumference is measured routinely – generally until they reach toddler age.  Head circumference has always been an important part of documenting your child’s overall health, but new research is asking – “Can large head circumference predict brain damage or cerebral palsy?”

New research published in Obstetrics and Gynecology International is addressing this question with new research conducted on more than 4,700 infants.  Read on to learn more about the research and why it is important for families impacted by birth injuries or cerebral palsy.

Research Suggests Head Circumference Can Predict Brain Damage, Cerebral Palsy

White matter is a part of the brain consisting of nerve fibers linked to the spinal cord.  It is called white matter because of its pale appearance compared to other parts of the brain.  It is well documented that damage to the white matter of the brain is one of the leading risk factors for developing cerebral palsy, primarily in infants born prematurely.  New research, however, suggests a correlation between large head circumference and damage to the white matter, which can help predict brain damage or cerebral palsy among infants born at or near term.

One previous study described the traumatic birth injury and subsequent stroke suffered by a newborn.  She suffered from severe deformities in her face and head, and there was a clear depression on the upper left jaw and parietal bone.  Researchers noted that her head circumference at birth was large, placing her in the 90th percentile.  This finding helped researchers hone in on the correlation between large head circumference and damage to the white matter in the brain.

In the more recent study, researchers reviewed 4,725 ultrasound screenings of term-born infants.  Screenings were taken from day one to day 30.  Using this information, researchers created a morphometric index (MMI), which measured length, weight, and head circumference.  The MMI measurement was found to be a solid predictor for risk of damage to the white matter as compared to other clinical indicators.

Important Findings on Head Circumference

Of all the infants studied, 61 were found to have damage to the white matter.  The only factor closely associated with damage to the white matter was head circumference.  The findings were as follows:

  • Infants with a head circumference placing them in less than the 10th percentile, or greater than the 75th percentile, were up to 10 times more likely to have brain damage.
  • Infants in the 90th percentile or greater had 10 times or more the risk of brain damage to the white matter.
  • Among infants in the highest risk, boys were far more likely to have brain damage than girls, accounting for 74 percent of those studied.
  • The primary risk among newborns with a large head circumference was prolonged or complicated delivery, which can result in brain deformations or damage.
  • Among the newborns found to have brain damage, researchers noted the following:
    • 38 percent were placed in intensive care with symptoms of asphyxia
    • 62 percent of infants with brain damage exhibit no clinical signs, and bypass routine diagnosis or treatment, which may account for so many unexplained cases of cerebral palsy or developmental delays in childhood.
    • There was no significant correlation between the MMI index and brain hemorrhages, premature breaking of the amniotic sac, intra-amniotic infection, bleeding during pregnancy, or miscarriage.

What this Research Means for Babies and Families

Around 28,000 birth injuries are reported in the U.S.  each year – many of them include brain damage.  Brain damage can range from mild with few symptoms, to severe causing lifelong disability.  It is important for healthcare providers to understand the risks of brain damage and take appropriate action to prevent injuries from occurring.

One of the most promising elements of these research findings is the narrowing of infants who may be at risk for having damage to the white matter of the brain.  Using the MMI index, healthcare providers can select infants born with a head circumference in less than the 10th percentile or greater than the 90th percentile for further imaging.  Infants in these percentiles may not exhibit signs of brain damage, but may benefit from additional testing to be certain.

Early detection and intervention is one of the best ways to improve outcomes for infants with brain damage.  This research offers hope and practical recommendations for healthcare providers that may help infants with brain damage get the diagnosis and treatment needed as soon as possible.  Researchers recommend risk management strategies for infants measuring with a large head circumference during sonograms or ultrasounds during pregnancy, to help avoid prolonged or difficult labor.

Learn More about Infant Brain Damage

If your child has suffered brain damage during pregnancy or at birth, your world may feel upside down.  One of the best ways that you can start advocating for your child is to learn as much as you can about infant brain damage and birth injuries.  You may want to explore whether your child’s injury was due to congenital factors, or was a result of negligence.  You may also find it helpful to explore your options for financial and other support or assistance.

To find out more, view our Infant Brain Damage topics, or contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our skilled birth injury attorneys.  Or, to schedule a free case review, fill out our online form.

The post Can Large Head Circumference Predict Brain Damage or Cerebral Palsy? appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
Graco High Chair Recall Highlights Importance of Safety and Proper Use https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/03/graco-high-chair-recall-highlights-importance-of-safety-and-proper-use/ Tue, 20 Mar 2018 03:11:26 +0000 http://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=14719 A recent Graco high chair recall is highlighting the importance of safety and proper use of high chairs.  If you have an infant or toddler, a high chair is likely an important part of your household.  Learn more about the …

The post Graco High Chair Recall Highlights Importance of Safety and Proper Use appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
A recent Graco high chair recall is highlighting the importance of safety and proper use of high chairs.  If you have an infant or toddler, a high chair is likely an important part of your household.  Learn more about the high chair recall, see if you are impacted, and find out more about how to keep your child safe while using a high chair.

Graco High Chair Recall Information

On March 1, 2018, Graco initiated a recall of more than 36,000 Table2Table 6-in-1 high chairs sold exclusively at Wal-Mart stores.  The Table2Table high chair is a convertible model that can be converted from a traditional high chair to a booster seat, then to a toddler seat and accompanying table.

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the rear legs of the high chair can pivot out of normal position, causing instability making the chair collapse or fall over.  At the time of the high chair recall, the company reportedly received 38 reports of malfunctions causing the chair to collapse.  Five children have reportedly been injured due to the defect.

The recalled high chairs were sold at Wal-Mart stores between October 2016 and December 2017.  The affected chairs have a model number of 1969721.  At least 36,000 chairs were sold in the United States, and another 3,200 were sold in Canada.  The recall affects all products sold in both locations.

Graco has apologized to consumers for the defect, and is offering a free repair kit for families affected by the recall.  Consumers who have the Table2Table product are urged to stop using the chair immediately and contact Graco to find out more about how to obtain the repair kit.

If you have questions about defective products and how to protect your legal rights, contact Brown & Brothers to learn more.

How to Keep Your Kids Safe in a High Chair

Like any manufactured product, high chairs can be dangerous if they are defective, are not used properly, or if the model selected is not appropriate for your child.  So, how can you know which models are safe or appropriate? Consider the following tips from the Good Housekeeping Institute:

Safety Features:

  • Choose a model with a wide base for added stability.
  • Look for models equipped with a waist and crotch strap, or a waist strap and a post to prevent your child from slipping under the tray.
  • If you are considering a folding high chair, look for models equipped with a locking mechanism to ensure the chair doesn’t fold up during use.

Selection and Use:

  • Make sure the model high chair you are using is appropriate for your child’s weight. If your child has surpassed the weight limit, it’s time to replace the chair.
  • Keep high chairs pulled away from walls, counters, or tables, as children can push against these surfaces causing the chair to flip.
  • Make sure that locking mechanisms on the chair or tray are properly secured prior to each use.
  • When purchasing a new high chair, consider purchasing a model that is certified by the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association (JPMA).

Because manufactured products are often subject to review, complaints, and recalls, it is also a good idea to check if a product you are considering purchasing has been subject to any recalls or consumer complaints.  You can also monitor the CPSC and other websites to stay in touch with what products are under a recall or consumer warning.

Protect Your Rights as a Consumer

As a consumer, you put your trust in the products you purchase to perform as they are advertised.  Unfortunately, sometimes products are defective or dangerous due to manufacturing error or negligence in the manufacturing process.  The three most common types of product defect include:

  • Defects in manufacturing
  • Defects in Design
  • Defects in warnings or labels

When manufacturers are alerted that a product is defective, they have a responsibility of warning consumers, such as initiating a recall or a consumer alert.  An unfortunate reality is that by the time manufacturers are aware of a defective or dangerous product, harm most often has already occurred.

For consumers who have been injured, it is important to understand your legal rights and take action.  Depending on your situation and the harm you or a loved one suffered, you may have legal recourse, which can provide financial compensation for your injuries and losses.  The two primary avenues for legal remedy in defective product cases include:

  • Negligence: You may be able to recover damages if you can prove that a manufacturer, retailer, or other applicable party was negligent and breached their duty of care owed to consumers. If it can be proven that this breach caused harm, then you may have a products liability claim, and may be able to recover monetary awards.
  • Strict Liability: Manufacturers have what is called “strict liability”, meaning that they are directly liable for defects that occur during the manufacturing process. In these cases, you do not have to prove negligence occurred so long as the injury was directly caused by a manufacturing defect.

Determining what legal factors apply to your situation can be difficult, and is best done with the guidance of a skilled attorney.  Contact Brown & Brothers today to learn more about protecting your legal rights as a consumer.  Fill out our online form to get started.

The post Graco High Chair Recall Highlights Importance of Safety and Proper Use appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
How Does Neonatal Stroke Affect Babies Long Term? https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/03/neonatal-stroke-affect-babies-long-term/ Mon, 05 Mar 2018 01:08:04 +0000 http://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=14634 Most people don’t know that newborns are at the same risk of suffering a stroke as elderly individuals.  With the side effects of stroke commonly known, one must ask – “how does neonatal stroke affect babies long term?” For parents, …

The post How Does Neonatal Stroke Affect Babies Long Term? appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
Most people don’t know that newborns are at the same risk of suffering a stroke as elderly individuals.  With the side effects of stroke commonly known, one must ask – “how does neonatal stroke affect babies long term?” For parents, understanding how a stroke may affect your child now, and in the future, is important for making decisions about his or her care.

These considerations are also important for researchers, such as those at Georgetown University who published the results of a study in February 2018 focused on how infant brains adapt after a stroke.  Take a look at a summary of the research, as well as helpful information about neonatal stroke.  To learn more, contact Brown & Brothers.

Study Examines Stroke Survivors and how the Brain Adapts

Researchers at Georgetown University examined the medical records and status of 12 individuals who had survived a neonatal stroke.  Now with ages ranging from 12 to 25, researchers wanted to determine what impact the stroke had on the child’s long-term health and wellbeing.  For the most part, those studied demonstrated little evidence of having had a stroke.  One participant walked with a limp, and several made their left hands dominant due to damage in functionality on the right side.  All demonstrated good language skills.

Researchers noted that during the perinatal period, an infant’s brain is very plastic, which makes it easier to adapt.  When one part of the brain is damaged, the developing brain can reallocate skills to another healthy part of the brain.  There are specific regions of the brain that may function as an alternate when damage occurs, but researchers warned that there are limitations.

Even so, understanding that there are regions of the brain that can take over for functions like language or spatial skills offers promise for managing and treating symptoms associated with a stroke.  The promising results of this study has led to an extended group, and will examine functions other than language in the hopes of identifying regions of the brain that have taken over.

Researchers also hope to gain a better understanding of the plasticity of the brain, to see if there is a way to “switch on” that plasticity and adaptability in adults.  The hope is to find better ways of managing care for adults who have suffered a brain injury or stroke.

Neonatal Stroke Information

Estimates indicate that stroke occurs in approximately one out of every 4,000 births.  These strokes may occur shortly before, during, or shortly after the baby is born.  Most infant strokes occur within a month of the baby being born.

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is disrupted.  This may be caused by damage or rupture of the blood vessels, a blood clot traveling to the brain, or a lack of oxygen supply to the brain.  The causes of neonatal stroke vary, and include factors like the mother’s health, the health of the baby, and complications of pregnancy, labor, or delivery.  Some of the more common factors associated with neonatal stroke include:

  • Blood clots
  • Hypoxia (oxygen deprivation)
  • Maternal infections
  • Autoimmune disorders (mother or child)
  • Prenatal cocaine exposure
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Diabetes
  • Trauma during pregnancy, labor, or delivery

Sometimes babies who appear perfectly healthy, who did not have a complicated pregnancy or maternal factors, can still suffer a stroke.  The causes of stroke are sometimes more difficult to determine, which is why more research is needed to better understand why they occur and how best to treat them.

Treating Neonatal Stroke Patients  

When an infant suffers a stroke, there is no doubt the situation is terrifying.  Fortunately, infants are more likely to recover from a stroke due to the plasticity and adaptability of their brain and nervous system.  What is most important is getting immediate treatment for the stroke, then planning for future care and healthcare-related needs.

The most common treatments for neonatal stroke patients include:

  • Administering fluids to keep the patient hydrated, or to rehydrate
  • Providing oxygen if needed
  • Ordering blood transfusions if needed
  • Treating heart conditions
  • Administering blood thinners (medication)
  • Ordering therapies for immediate, or long-term treatment (occupational, physical, and speech therapy are often beneficial)

Timely diagnosis and treatment of a stroke can go a long way toward improving the patient’s prognosis.  Many people who suffer neonatal stroke go on to live a healthy, productive life.  There are, unfortunately, others who develop complications or other conditions that may affect their overall wellbeing and prognosis.

Another factor that may contribute to the treatment and prognosis of stroke survivors is what caused the stroke and how severe the damage to the brain is.  In cases where the cause of stroke was a traumatic brain injury, there may be more significant damage to the brain.  It is important to understand the causes when developing a treatment plan.

Learn More about Neonatal Stroke and Other Birth Injuries

If you have questions about neonatal stroke or other birth injuries, check out our website and blog, or contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our birth injury attorneys.  Birth injuries have a profound impact on your family, and we are here to offer support and guidance wherever possible.  Fill out our online form to learn more or schedule a free case review.

The post How Does Neonatal Stroke Affect Babies Long Term? appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
Delaware Judge Awards Over $40 million to Birth Injury Victim and Family https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/02/delaware-judge-awards-40-million-birth-injury-victim-family/ Mon, 19 Feb 2018 16:23:37 +0000 http://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=14549 In what is being called the largest personal injury verdict in Delaware County, a judge has awarded over $40 million to a birth injury victim and her family.  The birth injury victim, now six years old, suffered a spinal injury …

The post Delaware Judge Awards Over $40 million to Birth Injury Victim and Family appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
In what is being called the largest personal injury verdict in Delaware County, a judge has awarded over $40 million to a birth injury victim and her family.  The birth injury victim, now six years old, suffered a spinal injury during birth, which left her paralyzed from the chest down.    The total award amount was $40.26 million, with $10 awarded for past and future pain and suffering, and the remainder of the award allocated for future economic damages.

In this post, we will discuss this birth injury case, and then provide some helpful information about spinal cord-related birth injuries.  To learn more, contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our birth injury attorneys.

Spinal Birth Injury Case Information

In March 2011, the Delaware mother in this case, pregnant with twins, presented at Delaware County Memorial Hospital to have labor induced.  The twins were reported to be healthy.  The woman was reportedly told that the twins would be delivered via Cesarean section (c-section), but the attending physician proceeded with a vaginal delivery instead.

During delivery, the first twin was born without incident.  The second was found to be in the footling breech position, which typically facilitates a c-section delivery.  Instead, the doctor continued to push for vaginal delivery, and held the baby, attempting to pull her through the cervix.  During this process, there was an audible “loud popping sound”, which was heard throughout the room and was later documented by nurses.  The baby suffered a traumatic spinal injury during delivery.

As a result of the traumatic birth, the child is bound to a wheelchair, wears diapers, and cannot feed herself.  She will require constant care for her daily needs, and will need lifelong occupational and physical therapy.  An economist estimated the future medical costs required by the child to be $29 million.

In the lawsuit, the family alleged that the attending physician used excessive force during delivery.  The physician has denied that his actions were outside the standards of care, and while admitting to hearing the popping sound, contends that no one in the room knew where the noise originated.  A jury did not agree with his arguments, and ruled in favor of the plaintiff family.

Spinal Cord-Related Birth Injuries

Spinal cord damage during birth can be traumatic and have a lifelong impact on your child and family.  There are several different reasons why spinal injuries occur during birth, with the most common being:

  • Traction used during a breech delivery
  • Rotational stress applied to the spine
  • Hyperextension of the head
  • Brachial plexus-related injuries to the spinal cord and nerves

Spinal cord injuries are among the most damaging because so much of what the human body does is centered on those delicate bones, muscles, and nerves.  Depending on the severity of the damage, a spinal injury may cause the following:

  • Inability to move (paralysis)
  • Loss of sensation
  • Abnormal reflexes
  • Spasms
  • Stinging pains
  • Weakness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Inability to control bladder or bowels

If your child’s delivery was complicated or traumatic, or there was a noticeable injury, these symptoms may indicate that your child’s spinal cord was damaged.  It is important to take note of these symptoms and discuss them with your child’s doctor immediately.

Depending on the nature and severity of your child’s injuries, treatment may improve or even resolve symptoms.  In more serious cases, like the case discussed above, the damage cannot be resolved and will result in lifelong medical care and therapy.  In either case, it is important that you understand your child’s needs and legal rights, and get help.

Get Help with Your Birth Injury Case

While no monetary award can make up for the trauma and lifelong consequences of a birth injury, cases like this one highlight how a birth injury lawsuit can offer, at the very least, some financial respite.  The costs associated with traumatic birth injuries can range, but often top the millions of dollars.  This makes it very difficult for families to get the help and medical care they really need.

If your child was injured during birth, and you believe that medical malpractice or negligence was the cause, contact Brown & Brothers today for a free consultation.  Our medical malpractice and birth injury attorneys can answer your questions and offer solutions that will protect your family’s future.  Fill out our online form to get started.

 

 

The post Delaware Judge Awards Over $40 million to Birth Injury Victim and Family appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
Texas Family Wins Fight with School District over Assistive Device Use on Campus https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/02/texas-family-wins-fight-school-district-assistive-device-use-campus/ Sat, 10 Feb 2018 18:02:16 +0000 http://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=14496 A Texas family has won the fight with their local school district over an assistive device their disabled son needs to use while on campus.  The teenager, a student at Veterans Memorial High School, suffered a birth injury that damaged …

The post Texas Family Wins Fight with School District over Assistive Device Use on Campus appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
A Texas family has won the fight with their local school district over an assistive device their disabled son needs to use while on campus.  The teenager, a student at Veterans Memorial High School, suffered a birth injury that damaged more than 65 percent of his brain.  As a result, the teenager suffers from quadriplegic cerebral palsy, refractory epilepsy, visual impairments, and developmental disabilities.  Further, the teenager is non-verbal and cannot walk without assistance.

For most of his life, this Texas teenager has been confined to a wheelchair, but an assistive device called a Therapeutic Ambulatory Orthotic System (TAOS) has provided the teenager with the assistance needed to help him be more mobile and independent.  In January 2018, the school district restricted use of the device on the basis that the teenager had outgrown it, and ruled it a safety concern.  Without TAOS, the teenager was required to spend the entire day in his wheelchair, which can be difficult and painful.

A spokesperson for Judson Independent School District said that the teenagers height and weight are outside the manufacturers safety specifications.  The manufacturer, Sky Medical, however reviewed the teenagers specifications and made an exception to the recommended weight and height based on their review.  Judson ISD said that the letter from the manufacturer was not enough.

Local news sources immediately began reporting on the issue, featuring photographs of the teenager using the TAOS device in a hallway.  While the family planned to attend school board meetings to further plead their case, the teenager’s doctor cleared up the height and weight debate.  As a result, Judson ISD contacted his family and informed them that their son would be allowed to use the TAOS device effective immediately.

For a teenager who has battled so many trials in his life, this was a victory allowing him more independence and freedom to move around.  For his family, it is a huge relief that their son will not be confined to a wheelchair for the entire eight-hour school day.

If your child suffered a birth injury and, as a result, requires the use of an assistive device, contact Brown & Brothers to learn more about your legal rights.  When your child’s quality of life depends on an assistive device, we can help ensure that your case is heard.

Assistive Device Use and Cerebral Palsy

Individuals with cerebral palsy often require assistive devices to help them with tasks that many of us take for granted.  Cerebral palsy commonly causes difficulties with mobility, communication, eating and drinking, hygiene, and learning.  Assistive devices like TAOS are commonly used to help the individual gain more strength and independence.

Working with individuals who have cerebral palsy often requires modification and planning – be it at home, school, or in a therapeutic environment.  It is important that those working closely with these individuals understand their needs and what modifications may be required to ensure that the individual has the best opportunities and quality of life possible.

Some of the common assistive devices used to help individuals with cerebral palsy include:

  • Electronic devices designed to assist with communication, both verbal and written.
  • Assistive devices like TAOS, gait trainers, walkers, leg braces, or canes, which help with mobility and balance.
  • Adapted feeding gear, such as nosey cups and ergonomically designed utensils.
  • Braces and Thumb Positioning Systems to help with wrist movements and stability while writing or completing tasks.
  • Shape wear and vests designed to help with posture and balance.
  • Bath or shower assistive devices, such as chairs, handles, or modified tubs/showers.
  • Toilet chairs to reduce the risk of falls and provide support for the individual’s body.

In addition to assistive devices, individuals with cerebral palsy often require assistance and modification in various activities, such as:

  • Assistance with personal care and hygiene, such as brushing hair and teeth, dressing, tying shoelaces, etc.
  • Assistance with meal preparation and eating, which can be difficult for individuals with poor grip or motor skills.
  • Modified feeding, such as liquid or soft food diets.
  • Modified learning environments, such as use of electronic devices or manual manipulation, IEP development, etc.

 How to Support Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

There is no question that living with cerebral palsy is challenging.  Fortunately, there are many ways that you can plan and prepare to help your loved one live a healthy, productive life.  Support for individuals with cerebral palsy begins at home and extends to their healthcare providers, schools, and communities.

Because cerebral palsy is so prevalent in the United States, there are numerous support groups and organizations designed to help families.  Through these groups you can find resources and support for home, school, independence, related laws, treatments, and much more.  To find a support group near you, consider the following options:

  • Contact your local hospital or health department to find out if there are affiliated support groups.
  • Most states have a statewide organization designed to support families with cerebral palsy.
  • There are numerous online groups and “meet ups” allowing families to network and connect with other families affected by cerebral palsy.
  • United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a group that works with more than 100 affiliates nationwide to support the cerebral palsy community.
  • Cerebral Palsy International Research Foundation (CPIRF) offers a multitude of resources related to current research, innovations in technology, preventative strategies, and developing treatment options.
  • Cerebral Palsy Family Network (CPFN) is a community-focused organization offering medical and legal resources and information for families. CPFN offers downloadable resources and a state-by-state database for resources and services.

Legal Support for Cerebral Palsy

When a birth injury results in a diagnosis of cerebral palsy, it is important to work with an attorney to ensure that your legal rights are protected.   For help with legal-related matters, including restricted use of assistive devices, questions about care, discrimination, malpractice or negligence, contact Brown & Brothers to discuss your case.  Fill out our online form to get started right away.

 

The post Texas Family Wins Fight with School District over Assistive Device Use on Campus appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
Can Inflammation from Infection Cause Adult-Onset Heart Problems? https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/02/can-inflammation-infection-cause-adult-onset-heart-problems/ Sat, 03 Feb 2018 21:24:13 +0000 http://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=14449 One of the key elements of development is the idea that what we are exposed to as children will affect us as we age.  In this post titled “Can Inflammation from Infection Cause Adult-Onset Heart Problems”, we will discuss new …

The post Can Inflammation from Infection Cause Adult-Onset Heart Problems? appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
One of the key elements of development is the idea that what we are exposed to as children will affect us as we age.  In this post titled “Can Inflammation from Infection Cause Adult-Onset Heart Problems”, we will discuss new research suggesting that exposure to certain medical conditions as infants or children may be linked to development of certain medical conditions as adults.

Premature birth, as well as those complicated by infection, often carry the risk of damage to the brain and lungs.  Now, researchers believe that these risk factors can have a profound impact on heart development and the risk of developing heart problems as adults.

Can Inflammation from Infection Cause Adult-Onset Heart Problems?

Researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine recently published findings of a study connecting preterm birth and adult-onset heart disease.  The study, published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, defined genetic networks disrupted by inflammation and infection that could interfere with normal heart development.

Focused on premature labor and delivery, researchers studied heart tissue from pigtail macaque monkeys whose mothers’ uteruses were infected with bacteria like Escherichia coli (E-coli) and group B Streptococcus – two bacterial infections that often contribute to premature birth in humans.  Macaque monkeys were chosen for the research because their animal models are considered among the closest to that of human pregnancies.

Researchers studied the fetal heart tissue of the monkeys infected with bacteria and compared it to that of normal samples.  Gene expression patterns were studied and compared, and it was determined that bacterial infections interrupted fetal heart development.  Incomplete heart development may increase the risk of abnormal heart rhythms and adult-onset heart failure.

Prematurity occurs in around two percent of all births in the United States, and is commonly linked to severe infections.  These infections have been shown to cause an inflammatory response in the fetus, which can be seen in certain proteins and tissues.  Researchers also noted that changes in gene networks or expression can affect many aspects of healthy heart development, including development of blood vessels, migration of cells, growth of cardiac muscles, and migration of endothelial cells, which line blood vessels and the heart.

One Step Closer to Understanding Risks of Prematurity

There are many areas of prematurity and related risks that researchers are just beginning to understand.  The link between infection, inflammation, and risk of adult-onset cardiac problems is one step closer to understanding the long-term risks of prematurity.  Researchers continue to suggest that further research is needed to truly understand how research like that discussed in this article could impact healthcare for women in premature labor.

Researchers state that there is a need for a better understanding of how bacteria invades the uterus and exactly what impact bacteria has on premature birth and the health of mother and child.  Gaining a better understanding of bacteria and how it impacts mother and child can lead to better options for prevention, intervention, and treatment when infections do occur.  For example, could combining antibiotics with anti-inflammatory drugs reduce the risk of damage to fetal heart tissue? Can certain vaccines be developed for use during pregnancy to reduce the risk of bacterial infections like group B Streptococcus?

For more information on maternal infections or premature birth, review our website, or contact Brown & Brothers to learn more.

Common Maternal Infections and Risk Factors

Bacterial infections during pregnancy can occur, and impact the health of you and your child, at any time from implantation to delivery and beyond.  The most common bacterial infections experienced during pregnancy are:

  • Group B Streptococcus: Group B Streptococcus (GBS) can be transmitted to your child during pregnancy or delivery. GBS can lead to maternal health problems like cystitis, amnionitis, and stillbirth.  In babies, GBS can cause sepsis, pneumonia, or meningitis.  Some sources also suggest babies contracting GBS during pregnancy or delivery may be susceptible to vision or hearing loss or learning disabilities.
  • Urinary Tract Infections: While common, some UTI’s are more dangerous than others. UTI’s affect approximately 10-15 percent of pregnant women, and can contribute to preterm labor and other conditions.
  • Listeriosis: Around one-third of all listeriosis cases are among pregnant women, most commonly during the third trimester. Listeriosis can cause flu-like symptoms, and may lead to amnionitis, septic abortion, preterm labor, and even stillbirth.  Babies affected by listeriosis may develop more serious bacterial infections requiring hospitalization and antibiotic treatment.
  • Syphilis: When maternal syphilis infections occur, there is an almost 100 percent chance that the fetus will also be infected. Syphilis can cause maternal rash, ulcers, discomfort, and preterm labor.  In babies, syphilis can cause neonatal disease, latent infection, late abortion, or stillbirth.
  • Chlamydia: Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the U.S. Around 75 percent of all infected women never have symptoms, but that does not mean they should not be tested during pregnancy.  In women, Chlamydia can cause cervicitis, PID, acute urethral syndrome, gestational bleeding, and postpartum endometritis.  In babies, Chlamydia is most often transmitted during the second stage of labor, and effects may include conjunctivitis, pneumonia, and other pregnancy-related complications.
  • Gonorrhea: The second most prevalent STD in the U.S., gonorrhea is asymptomatic in around 50 percent of infected individuals. Nonetheless, testing for gonorrhea during pregnancy is important.  In babies, gonorrhea can cause conjunctivitis, arthritis, sepsis, and meningitis.

Because many of these infections do not cause symptoms in pregnant women, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends all pregnant women be tested for certain infections during pregnancy.  Depending on the infection, your doctor may recommend testing at different points in pregnancy, during delivery, or even during the postpartum period.  Pregnancy weakens immunities and infections can cause a multitude of complications to you and your child.

If you are pregnant and suspect you may have an infection, or have been exposed to bacteria that causes infections, talk to your doctor right away.  Prevention and swift treatment options are the best way to reduce the risk of maternal infections causing preterm labor and complications that may affect the health of you and your child.

Learn More about Maternal Infections and Your Rights

If you are pregnant, it is important that you and your healthcare providers discuss infections and how they can affect your pregnancy.  Failure to recognize, treat, and monitor maternal infections can result in complications and birth injuries that may escalate into serious medical conditions.  To learn more about maternal infections, birth injuries, or your legal rights as a patient, contact Brown & Brothers by filling out our online form.

The post Can Inflammation from Infection Cause Adult-Onset Heart Problems? appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
New Study Shows Prematurity Linked to Language and Speech Delays https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/01/prematurity-linked-language-speech-delays/ Thu, 25 Jan 2018 17:04:26 +0000 http://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=14370 A new study published in eNeuro, a journal for the Society of Neuroscience, shows that prematurity is linked to language and speech delays in babies.  Premature birth is often linked to an increased risk of physical and cognitive delays or …

The post New Study Shows Prematurity Linked to Language and Speech Delays appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
A new study published in eNeuro, a journal for the Society of Neuroscience, shows that prematurity is linked to language and speech delays in babies.  Premature birth is often linked to an increased risk of physical and cognitive delays or development problems, but the new study offers a focused look at how prematurity can cause brain damage.

According to the findings in eNeuro, children born in the early weeks of the third trimester are more likely to experience delays in development of crucial brain structures including the auditory cortex.  The auditory cortex is the part of the brain essential to hearing.  Delayed development of the auditory cortex can impact communication skills as the child grows up.

Prematurity and Delayed Brain Development

Prematurity is defined as a birth occurring before 37 weeks gestation.  By this time, most of the critical systems of the body and brain are functional.  However, as the eNeuro study notes, the earlier in the third trimester the birth is (the third trimester begins at 28 weeks gestation), the more likely that the child will suffer developmental issues.

Prematurity is traumatic for infants and makes them more vulnerable to many conditions and complications.  One of the most common birth injuries related to prematurity is hypoxic ischemia, which occurs when the infant’s brain does not get enough oxygen, most often because of a lack of lung development.  Hypoxic ischemia can occur before, during, or after birth.  It can result from prematurity or a variety of other complications or conditions.

To learn more about hypoxic ischemia, browse our infant brain damage topics, or contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our birth injury attorneys.

Focused Research on Prematurity and Brain Development

As early as the first trimester, or more specifically 15 weeks gestation, the basic neural systems related to hearing are functional, making babies at this early gestation already sensitive to language and speech related functions.  A baby’s ears and basic auditory systems are functionally developed by 25 weeks gestation, but are not completely developed until five or six months after birth.

Researchers point to previous studies indicating that babies develop hearing, listening, and response mechanisms in the womb by 25 weeks gestation.  Some studies have used ultrasounds to demonstrate babies blinking in response to external stimuli, such as sounds, voices, or music.  Based on these previous studies, researchers have focused their efforts on the specific ways that prematurity can affect speech, hearing, and learning.

The article published in eNeuro discusses a recent study conducted analyzing brain scans of both premature and full-term infants.  Researchers selected 90 premature infants who spent time in the neonatal intensive care unit at St.  Louis Children’s Hospital between 2007 and 2010.  For comparison, they selected 15 full-term infants at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St.  Louis.  These 15 infants had undergone brain scans within four days of birth to show uninterrupted brain development.

As they analyzed the information, researchers focused on the primary auditory cortex, which is the first cortical region of the brain that receives auditory signals from the ears.  They also looked closely at the nonprimary auditory cortex, which is part of the brain that does more advanced processing of information and facilitates speech and language.  As they compared and analyzed, they considered the following questions:

  • What is the relationship between these two parts of the brain?
  • Do these two parts of the brain mature at the same time, but at different rates?
  • Do these two parts of the brain mature at different times, but at similar rates?

The rates of maturation may affect how vulnerable each part of the brain is at different stages of development.  To complete their study, researchers used diffusion neuroimaging, which studied the auditory cortex of each infant.  Diffusion refers to the level of water in brain tissue, which changes as the brain grows and develops.  Measuring diffusion allowed researchers to see changes in white and gray matter, and track development.

Conclusions Based on Study

Based on the research and analysis, researchers determined the following:

  • By 26 weeks gestation, primary auditory cortex development was much more advanced than that of the nonprimary auditory cortex.
  • Both auditory regions were less developed at 40 weeks among premature infants than in full-term infants.
  • Between 26 and 40 weeks gestation (the period in which most premature births occur), the nonprimary auditory complex was still undergoing major changes in development.

In their quest for answers, researchers found a link between delayed development of the nonprimary auditory cortex and common language delays seen by age two.  This finding suggests that damage or disruption to this part of the brain as a result of prematurity may contribute to language and speech problems often reported in children who were premature at birth.

For the future, doctors can use this and similar research as a guide to understanding how prematurity affects the brain.  It can help doctors better predict potential language or speech issues in children born premature, which can result in better early intervention strategies.

What Parents Need to Know

Prematurity can be a scary prospect for expectant parents.  Most early conversations about the possibility of premature birth include a lengthy list of possible complications or resulting conditions.  As mentioned before, premature birth can be traumatic for the infant.  Prematurity has been linked to:

  • Behavioral and personality issues
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • Anxiety
  • Neurological disorders including autism
  • Asthma and pulmonary problems
  • Vision, hearing, and dental problems
  • Increased risk of infection

Many of these conditions result from a lack of oxygen to the brain and vital organs.  It is important that any signs of premature labor be taken seriously.  Contact your healthcare provider if you have any symptoms of premature labor, or notice changes in the way your body and your baby feels or responds.  The only way to determine if you are in labor is getting a thorough exam by a healthcare provider.

If you have legal questions or concerns about prematurity, related complications, or other birth injuries, contact Brown & Brothers.  Our birth injury attorneys can help you understand your legal rights and determine your best options after a birth injury occurs.  Fill out our online form to schedule a free case evaluation.

The post New Study Shows Prematurity Linked to Language and Speech Delays appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
Appeals Court Ruling a Victory for Two Couples who Filed Wrongful Birth Claim https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/01/appeals-court-ruling-victory-two-couples-filed-wrongful-birth-claims/ Mon, 15 Jan 2018 14:17:16 +0000 http://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=14308 A New York Appeals Court ruling is a victory for two couples who filed a wrongful birth claim after their children were born with “Fragile X” – a rare chromosomal abnormality that can cause significant injuries and intellectual disabilities.  Wrongful …

The post Appeals Court Ruling a Victory for Two Couples who Filed Wrongful Birth Claim appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>
A New York Appeals Court ruling is a victory for two couples who filed a wrongful birth claim after their children were born with “Fragile X” – a rare chromosomal abnormality that can cause significant injuries and intellectual disabilities.  Wrongful birth is a hotly debated area of the law, and reactions to the Appeals Court’s decision seem to be varied.

At Brown & Brothers, we help clients with cases of all shapes and sizes.  We are not afraid to tackle complicated legal matters, and have experience with wrongful birth law.  Read on to learn more about our wrongful birth lawsuit example, how Fragile X Syndrome affects children, and what you can do to protect your legal rights.

Wrongful Birth Lawsuit Information

Born in 2009, the Fragile X abnormality was not discovered until the two infants in this case were a few months old.  It was two years later when the parents sued their fertility doctor and the clinic he operated after the defect was traced back to the donated eggs.

The couples had been told that genetic testing was completed, but argue that the clinic failed to screen women donating eggs for Fragile X and other genetic abnormalities.  After the children were born, the donors of the eggs were tested, and were both found to be carriers of Fragile X.  The lawsuit seeks damages including the expenses of raising a child with disabilities, but an amount has not been established.

After filing the lawsuit, defendants claimed that the statute of limitations had begun at the time of in vitro fertilization.  Both couples argued that the legal clock should begin ticking at the time of birth, or when the Fragile X abnormality was discovered.  The case went to New York’s highest court, which ruled to allow the case to proceed.

In a 5-1 decision, the Appeals Court ruled that the statute of limitations for this case (and potentially other similar cases in the future) should begin from the date of birth, and not the date of in vitro fertilization.  The Chief Judge stated that the circumstances in this case “preclude the parents from bringing the lawsuit until the child is born and thus the statute of limitations must run from the date of birth”.  The court ruled that prior to the children being born alive, there was no grounds for a lawsuit, so the statute of limitations should not begin before that time.

Case Highlights Complicated Nature of Wrongful Birth Claims

Wrongful birth claims are extremely complicated.  The root of a wrongful birth claim is the theory that had parents been informed that their child would be born with a genetic abnormality like Fragile X, that they would have chosen to terminate the pregnancy.  When the pregnancy begins with in vitro fertilization, there are additional factors to consider, such as the actions of the doctor and his or her clinical staff during the process of screening egg donors, informing parents, etc.  In the past, some wrongful birth claims have been made after parents were given the wrong information or test results, which impacted their decision-making.

There are many tests that doctors can perform to determine if there are genetic mutations or abnormalities in an egg, infant, or the mother.  Healthcare providers must be diligent in performing these tests as appropriate and communicating results to parents.  Further, they must fully disclose their findings and any options to prevent problems, or promote the best outcome possible.

When doctors fail to screen eggs or perform appropriate or required tests, they may be considered negligent if their actions led to the harm of the mother and/or child, or if their actions (or lack thereof) affected the parents’ ability to make informed decisions.

Information about Fragile X Syndrome

Fragile X Syndrome is uncommon statistically, yet it is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  The CDC estimates that only one in every 4,000 to 5,000 males, and one in every 6,000 to 8,000 females are born with the abnormality.

Most often, parents are the first to notice signs of Fragile X, such as missed developmental milestones, behavioral problems, or attention problems.  Depending on the mutation and related disorders, the symptoms may be more pronounced, or may change as the child ages.  Conditions caused by Fragile X, or occurring concurrently, often include:

  • Anxiety
  • Developmental delays
  • Attention problems
  • Hyperactivity
  • Autism
  • Self-injury
  • Aggression
  • Depression
  • Seizures

Individuals born with Fragile X often experience a lifetime of difficulties with learning, attention, and socialization.  The CDC has noted that about half of all families managing care of someone with Fragile X report that the disorder caused a significant financial burden.  Parents often find themselves with a large financial burden related to healthcare, therapies, home modifications, requirement to reduce hours or cease working, in-home care, and other medical costs.

Find out More about Wrongful Birth and Your Rights

Because wrongful birth is such a complicated and heavily controversial area of the law, if you have questions about wrongful birth, lawsuits, or how to get help, contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our attorneys.  Our team of attorneys manage cases involving medical malpractice or negligence, medical errors, birth injuries, and wrongful birth.  To schedule a free review of your case, or to get answers to your questions, fill out our online form.

The post Appeals Court Ruling a Victory for Two Couples who Filed Wrongful Birth Claim appeared first on Birth Injury Guide.

]]>