Birth Injury Guide https://www.birthinjuryguide.org A comprehensive resource for families coping with birth trauma Sun, 14 Oct 2018 22:58:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Is Cerebral Palsy Diagnosed at Birth? https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/10/cerebral-palsy-diagnosed-birth/ Thu, 04 Oct 2018 21:35:10 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=15980 Cerebral palsy is a physical disorder that is caused by brain damage before, during, or shortly after birth.  Since the injuries that cause cerebral palsy occur around the time of childbirth, many people wonder, “is cerebral palsy diagnosed at birth?” …

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Cerebral palsy is a physical disorder that is caused by brain damage before, during, or shortly after birth.  Since the injuries that cause cerebral palsy occur around the time of childbirth, many people wonder, “is cerebral palsy diagnosed at birth?” The answer to this question is not as simple as a “yes” or “no”.  Every case is different, and every child’s health is unique.  In order to answer this question, we must look at what causes cerebral palsy, and how it is most commonly recognized and diagnosed.

What is Cerebral Palsy?

The term cerebral palsy is used to describe a group of disorders that can affect the child’s muscles, coordination, reflexes, posture, movement, balance, and in some cases even their communication skills.  How cerebral palsy affects each child varies.

The vast majority of cerebral palsy cases are considered “congenital”, meaning that the brain damage occurred before or during childbirth.  The primary causes of congenital cerebral palsy include:

  • Low birth weight (less than 5.5 pounds)
  • Prematurity (born before 37 weeks)
  • Multiple births (twins, triplets, etc.)
  • Assisted reproductive technology (ART)
  • Maternal infections while pregnant
  • Maternal health conditions (seizures, thyroid problems, etc.)
  • Complications during birth (uterine rupture, placenta previa, umbilical cord problems, disrupted oxygen supply, etc.)
  • Infant jaundice or kernicterus

A smaller percentage of cerebral palsy cases are considered “acquired”, meaning that the brain damage occurs 28 days or more after birth.  The primary causes of acquired cerebral palsy include:

  • Infant infections (meningitis, encephalitis, etc.)
  • Brain injury (head injury due to auto accident, abuse, or other trauma)
  • Restricted blood flow to the brain (clotting problem, cerebrovascular accidents, stroke, bleeding in the brain, etc.)

Depending on the nature and severity of the brain damage, cerebral palsy may present a variety of symptoms.  These symptoms and your child’s overall health will factor into how your child is diagnosed.

Is Cerebral Palsy Diagnosed at Birth?

Diagnosing cerebral palsy is not as simple as a blood test or other standard diagnostic tool.  There is no known test that can confirm or deny the presence of cerebral palsy.  In answering the question of “is cerebral palsy diagnosed at birth”, we must consider the following:

  • Children with severe cerebral palsy may be diagnosed at birth or shortly thereafter.
  • In some cases, symptoms are so mild that they are not noticeable until the child is 12-18 months old.
  • Most cases of cerebral palsy can be diagnosed within two years of birth.
  • Some cases of cerebral palsy may not be diagnosed until the child’s brain is fully developed, which occurs at around three to five years old.

How is Cerebral Palsy Diagnosed?

Diagnosing cerebral palsy can be a complicated task.  As we have discussed, there are many variables that may impact the severity of the disorder, as well as the symptoms displayed.  With no fool-proof standardized method of diagnosing the disorder, healthcare providers must look at several factors when making a diagnosis.  These factors include:

  • Monitoring: Often, parental monitoring is the first sign that a child may have cerebral palsy. Parents and healthcare providers can look for indicators, such as:
    • Is the child meeting height and weight chart standards?
    • Is the child reaching developmental milestones on target?
    • How are the child’s reflexes?
    • Is the child able to focus on parents or caregivers, hear, and respond?
    • Does the child’s movement or posture seem abnormal?
  • Review: Your healthcare provider will also conduct a thorough review of your child’s overall health, as well as factors that may impact his or her health, such as genetics and birth injuries. This review may include:
    • Assessment of maternal reproductive health
    • Reviewing maternal and paternal health records
    • Reviewing labor and delivery records
    • Reviewing newborn APGAR and other screens
  • Testing: If your healthcare provider believes there are indicators enough to warrant testing, he or she may conduct one or more of the following tests:
    • Neuroimaging to check for brain damage
    • Electroencephalography (EEG) or electromyography (EMG) to assess nervous system function
    • Laboratory tests (genetic testing, urine, or blood samples)
    • Evaluation tests (speech, hearing, vision, mobility, feeding, digestion, cognitive function, gait, balance, and rehabilitation needs)

Unfortunately, diagnosing cerebral palsy can be a lengthy process, which is very difficult for parents and families.  Without a formal diagnosis, families may struggle to get the proper care needed for their child.

Getting Help with Cerebral Palsy Diagnosis and Treatment

For quite some time, there have been concerns among advocates and parents that part of the reason why diagnosing cerebral palsy can take so long is in an effort to pass the statute of limitations in cases where a birth injury, medical malpractice, or negligence occurred.  While most children can be diagnosed within two years of birth, there are many cases where children have symptoms and enter the diagnostic process, but do not get a formal diagnosis until they are much older, such as 8 years or older.

For parents who believe their child’s cerebral palsy was caused by a birth injury or doctor negligence, it is incredibly important to contact an attorney as soon as possible to discuss your case.  Cerebral palsy diagnosed at birth or later in life can have a major impact on your child and family. It is important that you understand your legal rights and the options that may be available to you in terms of support.

To learn more about cerebral palsy diagnosis, treatment, or options for support, contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our birth injury attorneys.  Fill out our online form to schedule your free case review.

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Can a Child Outgrow Cerebral Palsy? https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/09/can-child-outgrow-cerebral-palsy/ Thu, 27 Sep 2018 14:09:49 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=15960 Can a child outgrow cerebral palsy? This is a question many parents ask upon discovering that their child has the disorder.  There is an abundance of information available online discussing the varying ways that cerebral palsy affects individuals as they …

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Can a child outgrow cerebral palsy? This is a question many parents ask upon discovering that their child has the disorder.  There is an abundance of information available online discussing the varying ways that cerebral palsy affects individuals as they grow, develop, and age.  The symptoms associated with cerebral palsy often vary greatly, with some individuals showing almost no sign of having the condition.

But can a child outgrow cerebral palsy? Let’s take a look at what cerebral palsy is, how it impacts children, and what happens as individuals with cerebral palsy age.

What is Cerebral Palsy?

Cerebral palsy is the term used to describe a group of brain disorders that affect movement, posture, and balance.  The term “cerebral” is used because the disorder impacts the brain.  The term “palsy” is used to describe weakness or muscular problems.

Cerebral palsy is caused by abnormalities or damage in the brain during development.  Abnormalities occur during pregnancy, and injuries to the brain may occur during pregnancy or shortly after childbirth.  Depending on the part of the brain that is affected, cerebral palsy may be classified into one of four main categories, or types, which are:

  • Spastic Cerebral Palsy – The most common form, comprising around 80 percent of all cerebral palsy diagnoses. Spastic cerebral palsy results in stiff muscles in the limbs, and may impact only one side of the body, or both.
  • Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy – Dyskinetic cerebral palsy impacts movement of the limbs and extremities (hands and feet). Movements may be jerky or rapid, and are often uncontrollable.
  • Ataxic Cerebral Palsy – Ataxic cerebral palsy primarily impacts coordination and balance. Individuals with ataxic cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking or making detailed controlled movements like writing or reaching for objects.
  • Mixed Cerebral Palsy – Some individuals experience symptoms associated with more than one type of cerebral palsy. For these individuals, a mixed diagnosis is made, and treatment plans are established accordingly.

Everyone who is diagnosed with cerebral palsy experiences the disorder differently.  A great deal of the variance depends on the part of the brain that is damaged, the severity of that damage, and the presence of any related health conditions, such as seizures, or difficulty with vision or hearing.  These factors also impact treatment options and prognosis.

Can a Child Outgrow Cerebral Palsy?

Can a child outgrow cerebral palsy? The short answer to this question is “no”.  Cerebral palsy is a lifelong condition.  That does not mean, however, that someone cannot overcome symptoms and obstacles in order to live a more mobile, independent life.  Some research has shown that children involved with early intervention strategies have overcome some of the most limiting symptoms.

In 1981, the American Academy of Pediatrics published research identifying 118 children with cerebral palsy who were found to be “free of motor handicap at the age of 7 years”.  Symptoms resolved, or normalized, allowing children more independence.  It is important to note, however, that a normalizing of cerebral palsy symptoms did not show improvement or resolution of symptoms related to other disorders, such as seizures.

In this study, children who “outgrew” cerebral palsy symptoms were more likely to experience certain symptoms associated with related disorders, including seizures, speech abnormalities, and behavioral disorders.  This suggests that some children may be able to overcome their cerebral palsy symptoms, but that does not mean that they no longer have the disorder, or that they outgrew it.

How Does Cerebral Palsy Change as We Age?

Though one cannot outgrow cerebral palsy, the symptoms can definitely change as we age.  As we get older, the disorder does not get “worse”, but there can be shifts in symptoms and severity.  In 2016, the British Medical Journal (BMJ) published a study called “Ageing with Cerebral Palsy; What are the Health Experiences of Adults with Cerebral Palsy? A Qualitative Study”.

In this study, researchers aimed at increasing awareness of the relationship between aging and cerebral palsy.  The goal was to help enlighten healthcare providers and caregivers, though the results would be useful for anyone in contact with an individual diagnosed with cerebral palsy.  The study focused on five primary themes:

  • Acceptance of Change – Study participants were aware that changes would take place as they age, and that those changes would be different than what their non-cerebral palsy peers might experience. Participants reported:
    • Increased fatigue
    • Diminished energy
    • General “slowing down” at an earlier age than their peers
    • Need to adjust daily activities to compensate for fatigue and energy loss
    • Accepting changes for what they are was reported to be “liberating” for many individuals
  • Exploring Identity – All study participants reported that cerebral palsy was a component of their lives, but it did not encompass their entire being. Researchers noted a common thread during research – that aging has caused many participants to question who they are.  Participants questioned their personal and social identity more as they aged, with varying perceptions of their disabilities and how they were “seen” by themselves and others.
  • Taking Charge of Help – Study participants reported that aging led them to reflect on their need for help – be it current, increased, or future need. Participants who had more control and choices related to help reported a more positive experience.  Participants consistently reported a struggle between independence and dependence, and the need for to be actively involved in planning and maintaining caregiver relationships.
  • Rethinking the Future – Study participants often spoke about their futures – goals, aspirations, and plans. Most participants reported an understanding that physical limitations with aging may impact their plans.  Researchers noted that, to compensate, many participants began planning for the future earlier in life.
  • Interacting with Health Professionals – The majority of study participants were generally healthy, and most only relied on routine or “occasional” visits to their healthcare provider. Participants reflected on positive and negative interactions with healthcare providers, which suggested that cerebral palsy patients often feel that they are not being heard and are not allowed to be active participants in their healthcare.  Many participants reported feeling that they were not a priority for healthcare providers, or had been discarded.

As we age, no matter what our overall health may be, we inevitably take time to stop, reassess our goals and priorities, make plans for the future, and manage our care.  As this research shows, many individuals with cerebral palsy feel that they are not prioritized by healthcare providers, or are not allowed to be an active part of their health and wellness.  This is a serious injustice to these individuals, and should not be tolerated.

Learn More about Cerebral Palsy

Turning back to the original question of can a child outgrow cerebral palsy, we know that the answer is “no”.  However, research shows us that the future, including aging, can be promising for individuals with cerebral palsy.  Symptoms can resolve and change, and with some strategic or modified planning, the sky is the limit for individuals with cerebral palsy.

If you have questions about cerebral palsy, or need legal assistance with a birth injury case, contact Brown & Brothers today by completing our online form.

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Children’s Advil Recall Highlights Labeling and Overdose Risks https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/09/childrens-advil-recall-highlights-labeling-overdose-risks/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 01:20:29 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=15914 A recent recall of Children’s Advil highlights labeling and overdose risks that many doctors and parents may overlook.  As parents, we often take the advice of our pediatricians, or follow labeling directions without a second thought.  Unfortunately, sometimes manufacturers make …

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A recent recall of Children’s Advil highlights labeling and overdose risks that many doctors and parents may overlook.  As parents, we often take the advice of our pediatricians, or follow labeling directions without a second thought.  Unfortunately, sometimes manufacturers make mistakes with labeling or dosing information, and pediatricians may also make poor recommendations about medication use.

When such medication errors occur, your child may be at risk for overdosing, which can be devastating, even with commonly used over-the-counter (OTC) medications.  Read on to learn more about the Advil recall, as well as what you need to know about labeling and overdose risks.

Children’s Advil Recall Information

The last week of August 2018, Pfizer Consumer Healthcare announced a voluntary recall of their Children’s Advil Suspension Bubble Gum flavor medication.  According to the recall, the dosage cup included in the affected lot were marked in teaspoons, while the label instructed dosing to be measured in millimeters.  This labeling and dosing error could make it easy for accidental overdose to occur.

The affected Advil was sold in stores across the United States and has a lot number of R51129.  The expiration date on the 4 fl.  oz.  bottles is 11/20.  Parents who have purchased the defective product are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.  Parents with questions about the product or health risks are asked to contact Pfizer Consumer Healthcare directly.

OTC Medication Overdose Risks

Recalls like this one highlight a larger problem that is often overlooked, and that is overdose risk among infants and children.  As parents, we do our best to follow directions and make sure our kids are taken care of.  But when labeling fails or improper advice is given, our best efforts may not counteract all the possible adverse outcomes.

OTC medication has overdose risks for children, with symptoms ranging from irritating to potentially life-threatening.  In 2017, the journal Pediatrics released a study highlighting the potential dangers of OTC medicines, including cold and cough medicines containing drugs like Tylenol (acetaminophen) and Advil (ibuprofen).

Between 2009 and 2014, 3,251 children under 12 years old had reportedly suffered from cough and cold medicine related side effects.  Twenty children, mostly under two years old, reportedly died from ingesting the OTC medicines.  In two-thirds of these cases, the ingestion was the result of an unsupervised child consuming the medicine without safe dosing supervision.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) noted that the majority of adverse events and emergency room visits related to OTC medications are preventable.

The most common side effects associated with OTC medication overdoses in children include:

  • Children’s Advil: Common symptoms associated with ibuprofen overdose include:
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Headache
    • Dizziness
    • Blurred Vision
    • Drowsiness
  • Children’s Tylenol: Common symptoms associated with acetaminophen overdose in children include:
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Lethargy
    • Abdominal pain
    • Liver problems
  • Children’s Cough and Cold Medicine: These medicines contain ingredients like dextromethorphan (cough) or diphenhydramine (antihistamine like Benedryl). Overdosing on these drugs can cause the following symptoms:
    • Rapid or slow heart rate
    • Vomiting
    • Sweating
    • Abdominal pain
    • Lethargy
    • Labored breathing
    • Unresponsiveness

If your child has taken any of these medications and is exhibiting signs of overdose or an adverse reaction, it is important to contact your pediatrician immediately, or go to the emergency room.  Most overdoses or reactions can be treated if addressed in a timely manner.  It is important to get treatment quickly to avoid complications.

How to Keep Children Safe from OTC Medications

The CDC recommends the following safety tips for keeping medications out of reach, and ensuring that your entire family understands what medications are for, and how to properly use them:

  • Keep medications out of reach and out of sight. That includes OTC medications, prescriptions, cough drops, and even vitamins.
  • Be precise when administering medication. Read all labels carefully and use an appropriate dosing device.  A standard kitchen spoon is not adequate for proper dosing.
  • Keep medications secure at all times. When you are done using any medication, make sure the cap is locked.  Don’t underestimate your child’s ability to navigate “child proof” caps, so always keep them out of reach.
  • Talk to your children about medication safety. Explain to your children that medications are not candy (even though many taste good to appeal to little taste buds).  Help them understand that medicine is good when you need it, but that it is important to follow instructions and be safe, and always have a grown up give you medication.
  • Remind family members to keep medications safe. If you have family visiting or staying overnight, talk to them about any medications they may bring into your home, and ask them to keep them locked up and out of sight.
  • Any time you have questions about a medication, appropriateness for your child, or dosing information, contact your healthcare provider before administering the medication.
  • Keep emergency phone numbers handy in case your child gets into medication or ingests too much. Your local poison control center, pediatrician, or nurses hotline can be helpful.

Overall, OTC medicines designed for infants and children are safe when properly prescribed, dosed, and administered.  Unfortunately, medication errors do occur, and children can be seriously harmed by ingesting too much medication or an inappropriate medication.

If your child has been harmed due to a medication error, defective product, or improper dosing or administration by a healthcare provider, contact Brown & Brothers today to learn more about your legal rights as a parent, patient, and consumer.  Fill out our online form to learn more about overdose risks and your options for justice.

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32 Children’s Medicines Recalled after Possible Microbial Contamination https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/09/children-medicines-recalled-microbial-contamination/ Thu, 06 Sep 2018 02:48:50 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=15807 A nationwide recall of 32 children’s medicines due to possible microbial contamination has many parents concerned.  Safety concerns related to infant and children’s products are taken extremely seriously, and when a recall is issued, parents need to know how to …

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A nationwide recall of 32 children’s medicines due to possible microbial contamination has many parents concerned.  Safety concerns related to infant and children’s products are taken extremely seriously, and when a recall is issued, parents need to know how to keep their families safe.  Read on to learn more about the recall, why microbial contamination is dangerous, what you should do if you have one of the recalled products, and what you can do if your child is harmed by a dangerous or defective product.

32 Children’s Medicines Recalled after Possible Microbial Contamination

In August 2018, manufacturer King Bio announced a voluntary recall of 32 products designed for infants and children.  The 32 products recalled are all distributed under the name “Dr. King’s Natural Medicine” and are considered homeopathic alternatives to traditional medicines.

The report from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) states that certain lots of the products tested positive for microbial contamination, and out of “an abundance of caution”, a voluntary recall was initiated.  According to reports, the products identified as being potentially contaminated were sold between August 2017 and April 2018.

The type of microbial contaminant found was not disclosed, though it was noted that bacteria and viruses both are classified as microbial contaminants.  This recall is the second for King Bio, but is more concerning because it focuses on products designed for infants and children.  Overall, the recalls include hundreds of products designed for adults, children, and even pets.

Infant and children’s products included in the recall includes the following popular products:

  • Chicken Pox Symptom Relief
  • Children’s Cough Relief
  • Children’s Fever Reducer
  • DK Newborn Tonic
  • Children’s Ear Relief Formula
  • DK Teething
  • DK Colic Relief
  • Kids Multi-Strain Flu Relief
  • Kids Sleep Aid
  • Kids Stress & Anxiety
  • Kids Attention & Learning
  • Kids Candida (4 oz)
  • TonsilPlex
  • Tummy Aches

This list is not exhaustive, and consumers are urged to read the full report and recall list found on the Dr. King’s website.  To learn more about recalled products and your legal rights as a consumer, contact Brown & Brothers to speak with our team about your concerns and options.

What to do if you Have Purchased a Recalled Product

Exposure to microbial contamination could have a detrimental impact on a child’s health, including increased risk of infection.  Some infections resulting from microbial contamination could be life-threatening for certain individuals, including children, individuals with compromised immune systems, and pregnant women.

Consumers who have purchased a now recalled product are urged to stop using the product immediately.  Anyone who suspects that they or their child have been harmed by the product should contact their healthcare provider and file an adverse event report with the FDA.  So far, no reports of injury or illness have been reported.

King Bio is offering consumers the option of returning the product, or arranging a replacement.  You can find their contact information and a form for returns on their website.

What to do if your Child has Been Harmed by a Dangerous or Defective Product

The FDA and other regulatory agencies have been working diligently over the past several years to address concerns about the safety and effectiveness of homeopathic medicines.  FDA Commissioner, Scot Gottlieb, has expressed concern that some homeopathic medicines may not offer any real benefit, or in fact, may actually cause harm.  The FDA has been working to advance their regulatory and enforcement actions related to certain homeopathic products.

In recent years, homeopathic products have gained tremendous popularity.  Unfortunately, these products can sometimes be contaminated or defective, or may be an inappropriate alternative to traditional medicine, which can make them dangerous for consumers.  If you or your child have been harmed by a dangerous or defective product, it is important to consider your legal rights, as well as your health.

Sometimes harm caused by homeopathic products are the result of the manufacturing process, such as the microbial contamination discussed above.  In other cases, harm may be caused by a healthcare provider inappropriately ordering or suggesting a homeopathic alternative to traditional medicine that does not adequately address symptoms or a diagnosed health condition.

In either of these cases, if you or your child have been harmed by a dangerous or defective product, or by the inappropriate actions of a healthcare provider, contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our medical malpractice attorneys about your legal rights.  When it comes to healthcare and your legal rights, you need an attorney who has experience managing complex cases.

At Brown & Brothers, we offer knowledge, experience, and an assortment of valuable resources to help your case succeed.  To get started, fill out our online form, or call us toll free at 877-415-6603.

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The Role of Cardiotocography in Preventing Birth Injuries https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/08/role-cardiotocography-preventing-birth-injuries/ Tue, 28 Aug 2018 20:28:50 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=15785 In terms of birth injuries, medical errors involving fetal heart rate monitoring are among the more common.  Fetal heart rate monitoring, also called cardiotocography, is important in preventing birth injuries like brain damage, scarring, and injuries to the mother.  In …

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In terms of birth injuries, medical errors involving fetal heart rate monitoring are among the more common.  Fetal heart rate monitoring, also called cardiotocography, is important in preventing birth injuries like brain damage, scarring, and injuries to the mother.  In September 2017, NHS Resolution released information suggesting that a large number of cerebral palsy cases may be the result of cardiotocography errors.

Let’s take a closer look at what research shows, and why every expectant parent should be familiar with cardiotocography.  To learn more about birth injuries and improper fetal heart rate monitoring, contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our birth injury attorneys.

What is Cardiotocography?

Cardiotocography is the technical term for monitoring fetal heart rate and uterine contractions during labor.  Broken down, “cardiograph” relates to evaluation of the heart rate, and “tocograph” relates to the recording of uterine contractions.  The purpose of cardiotocography is to monitor fetal wellbeing and alert healthcare providers if the fetus becomes distressed.  If the fetus becomes distressed, healthcare providers must take action to investigate the situation, determine problems, and if necessary, initiate an emergency Cesarean section (c-section).

The information gathered in cardiotocography is relayed to doctors and midwives in real time, and can be valuable in determining the health of the infant, and the status of labor.  Fetal heart rate monitoring can be achieved in two different ways – external or internal – which include the following:

  • External: External cardiotocography may include ultrasound through the abdominal wall, or placement of a tocodynamometer at the fundus of the mother’s uterus.
  • Internal: Internal cardiotocography may include placement of an electrode on the scalp of the fetus while still in the womb. Internal monitoring is more accurate because maternal and fetal movements do not interfere with the monitoring.

Based on the information provided through monitoring, healthcare providers must make choices in the best interests of the mother and child.  Interpretation of monitoring reports include assessment of:

  • Baseline fetal heart rate: The average heart rate over a period of time, generally 10 minutes. A “normal” fetal heart rate is 110-150 beats per minute (BPM).
  • Baseline variability: If the variability of the fetal heart rate is 5 BPM or less, then it is considered abnormal. A normal variability is 5 BPM or greater.
  • Fetal heart rate acceleration: An “appropriate response” to a uterine contraction is an acceleration of the fetal heart rate.
  • Fetal heart rate deceleration: Any abrupt deceleration in the fetal heart rate may be a sign of distress. A deceleration of 15 BPM for a period of 15 seconds or longer is considered abnormal.

It is important for expectant parents to know that fetal heart rate may be impacted by a variety of factors, including fetal and maternal health.  Some of the maternal health conditions that may influence fetal heart rate include:

  • Maternal fever
  • Placental abruption
  • Uterine rupture
  • Preeclampsia
  • Gestational diabetes

Any of these conditions can impact fetal heart rate and the amount of oxygen transported to the baby.  Signs or symptoms of any of these conditions should be taken seriously, and healthcare providers should act quickly.

Cardiotocography and Birth Injuries

In any sort of diagnostics or monitoring, there is a certain level of uncertainty in interpretation.  That is why it is so important that healthcare providers understand systems like cardiotocography and how to properly interpret results and take action.  Currently, cardiotocography is the most effective way of monitoring fetal heart rate and uterine contractions.  Unfortunately, it continues to be one of the most common factors in birth injuries.

In September 2017, NHS Resolution reviewed 50 cerebral palsy cases and found that 32 of them involved errors in interpretation of cardiotocography reports.  These injuries may have been the result of improper interpretation, delays in responding to distress, improper monitor placement, or failure to order a c-section in a timely manner.  These are just a few of the ways that interpretation could result in birth injuries.

As noted, one of the most common birth injuries resulting from cardiotocography errors is cerebral palsy.  In addition, other birth injuries may include:

  • Oxygen deprivation
  • Brain damage
  • Paralysis
  • Nerve damage
  • Stillbirth or death

This list is not exhaustive.  To find out more about possible injuries caused by cardiotocography errors, contact your healthcare provider.

Protecting Your Health and Legal Rights

As a patient, you have certain expectations when you seek medical attention.  You expect your healthcare providers to provide safe, quality care that is in your best interests.  Unfortunately, that does not always happen.  As humans, we are all prone to mistakes, and sometimes birth injuries are the result of a true mistake.

In many other cases, however, birth injuries are caused by negligence – be it improperly monitoring fetal or maternal health, failure to address red flags, or failure to take action in a timely manner.  In any case, not only have your expectations been shattered, but your legal rights may have been as well.

If you or your child have been injured due to any of the factors discussed in this article, contact Brown & Brothers today to schedule a free case review with one of our birth injury attorneys.  Our staff and team of attorneys has knowledge and experience you can count on to understand your situation and take action.  To get started, fill out our online form, or call our office at 1-877-415-6603.

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Gestational Diabetes and the Risk of Birth Injuries https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/08/gestational-diabetes-risk-birth-injuries/ Tue, 21 Aug 2018 00:14:33 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=15781 Pregnancy is a time of joy and anticipation, but doctors warn that common medical conditions like gestational diabetes can overshadow that joy.  Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of birth injuries, so it is important that expectant mothers understand the …

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Pregnancy is a time of joy and anticipation, but doctors warn that common medical conditions like gestational diabetes can overshadow that joy.  Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of birth injuries, so it is important that expectant mothers understand the condition, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated.  Let’s take a look at gestational diabetes and the risk of birth injuries.

If you have questions about your individual health, you should contact your doctor to address your concerns.  If you would like to know more about birth injuries and your legal rights, contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our birth injury attorneys.

What is Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes mellitus that develops during pregnancy.  Gestational diabetes is similar to other forms of the condition in that it affects how sugar (glucose) is broken down in your body.  When your body digests food, some of it is processed into glucose, which enters your bloodstream.  To regulate your blood sugar levels, your pancreas produces insulin.  Insulin is a hormone that regulates glucose levels by moving them from your blood stream into your body’s energy cells.

Unlike other forms of diabetes, gestational diabetes only occurs during pregnancy and generally resolves with treatment or after delivery.  This form of diabetes occurs due to the placenta releasing certain hormones that can increase your blood sugar levels.  These hormones can impair insulin regulation mechanisms leaving your blood sugar elevated.  As your pregnancy progresses and your baby grows, the amount of hormones released by the placenta increases, which can make blood sugar levels more difficult to manage.

Gestational diabetes occurs in only seven out of every 100 women, or seven percent of pregnancies.  Most women are required to undergo tests for gestational diabetes as part of their routine prenatal care.  It is important to ensure that this test is done properly and is followed up on if the results suggest you may be diabetic.

Even though gestational diabetes can be controlled and often resolves after pregnancy, some women experience long-term complications, such as heart disease, kidney problems, and blindness.

Gestational Diabetes and Birth Injuries

In most cases, with proper diagnosis and a sound management plan, gestational diabetes does not cause serious complications.  Without proper treatment and an appropriate management plan, it can cause more serious complications or lead to other health conditions.  Some of these complications and conditions include:

  • Preeclampsia: A condition where high blood pressure leads to stroke, seizures, or failure of organs like the kidneys and liver.
  • Prematurity: Gestational diabetes may cause you to delivery your baby prematurely, or before 37 weeks gestation. The earlier you delivery, the greater the chances of health complications.
  • Large Weight Birth: Gestational diabetes can also result in larger than average birth weight. Baby’s weighing more than nine pounds increase your likelihood of needing a Cesarean section (c-section), and increases the risk of birth injuries during delivery.
  • Stillbirth: Stillbirth occurs when a baby dies in the womb at 20 weeks gestation or later.

Complications during pregnancy, labor, or delivery, can have a devastating impact on the outcome for you and your child.  Depending on the complications, doctors may need to take swift action or use assistive tools during delivery.  It is incredibly important that complications are taken seriously and appropriate measures taken to avoid further harm.

Failure to diagnose gestational diabetes is dangerous for you, but also for your baby.  For infants,  some of the complications of gestational diabetes include:

  • Jaundice
  • Breathing Problems
  • Low Blood Sugar
  • Heart Defects
  • Brain Defects

Any of these complications can be dangerous, or even life-threatening depending on your overall health and that of your baby, other complications, and early detection and treatment.

What are My Chances of Getting Gestational Diabetes?

There is no test that can tell you “yes” or “no” about whether you will develop gestational diabetes.  There are some risk factors, however, that may increase your chances, such as:

  • Being older than 25 years old
  • Being overweight
  • Gaining a lot of weight during your pregnancy
  • Family history of diabetes
  • Being African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American. Rates of gestational diabetes are higher among women in these categories.
  • Having been diagnosed with gestational diabetes in a prior pregnancy
  • Having given birth to a child weighing over nine pounds previously
  • Having given birth to a stillborn baby

If you have any of these risk factors, you should talk to your doctor about your chances of developing diabetes.

Protect Yourself and Your Legal Rights

Some healthcare systems are implementing policies to test for diabetes at the start of pregnancy, as well as later during routine prenatal care.  The goal of such testing is to help identify women who already have diabetes, as well as those who may be at a higher risk for developing gestational diabetes.

Unfortunately, despite advances in medicine and better policies, many cases of gestational diabetes go undiagnosed.  Healthcare providers have a duty to address concerns, recognize risk factors, and perform tests as needed to make an accurate diagnosis.  Failure to do so can be detrimental to your health, and may be a violation of your legal rights.

To learn more about your legal rights as a patient, contact Brown & Brothers.  Our birth injury attorneys can help you understand your legal rights if you are concerned about medical malpractice or negligence.  Fill out our online form to schedule your free case review.

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New Warnings about Vaginal Rejuvenation Procedures Following Childbirth https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/08/new-warnings-about-vaginal-rejuvenation-procedures-following-childbirth/ Thu, 09 Aug 2018 20:17:41 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=15772 After giving birth, most women look forward to getting their bodies back to “normal”. This is especially true since a vaginal delivery can lead to such problems as vaginal laxity and dryness, sexual dysfunction, and stress incontinence. Non-surgical vaginal rejuvenation …

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After giving birth, most women look forward to getting their bodies back to “normal”. This is especially true since a vaginal delivery can lead to such problems as vaginal laxity and dryness, sexual dysfunction, and stress incontinence.

Non-surgical vaginal rejuvenation is rapidly growing in popularity. Following the lead of numerous
celebrity endorsements and advertisements in popular magazines, tens of thousands of women are
choosing to use energy-based medical devices to achieve vaginal rejuvenation and for cosmetic
purposes. Now, the Federal Drug Administration is warning both patients and the health care community of the dangers of these products and procedures.

Alert from the Federal Drug Administration

Stating that the safety and effectiveness of these devices has not been established, the FDA warning
includes possible serious outcomes including vaginal burns, scarring, pain during sexual intercourse, and recurring/chronic pain. The FDA stresses that it has not approved any energy-based medical device for vaginal rejuvenation or vaginal cosmetic procedures, or for the treatment of vaginal symptoms related to urinary incontinence or sexual function. A May 2016 position statement issued by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists urges physicians to be “wary of adopting new or innovative procedures on the basis of promotions and marketing”.

Types of Energy-Based Devices for Vaginal Rejuvenation

Energy-based devices for feminine rejuvenation first became available in 2008 in Europe. There are two main technologies utilized:

Radiofrequency (RF) Treatments: Emit electromagnetic waves to heat the tissue. Brand names include:

  • ThermiVa
  • Viveve
  • ULTRA Femme 360
  • ReVive
  • Venus Fiore
  • Protégé Intima
  • Pelleve
  • Votiva

CO2 and Er:YAG (erbium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet) Lasers: Emit laser energy in the mid-infrared invisible light spectrum to heat the tissue. Brand names Include:

  • FemiLift
  • MonaLisa Touch®
  • DiVa
  • CO2RE Intima
  • FemTouch™
  • IntimaLase
  • Petit Lady

The complications which can occur from these products and procedures can mean that a new mother’s body may have more serious issues after the treatment than before the treatment. The FDA says the benefits of these devices for vaginal rejuvenation have not been proven, and it has reports of substantial injuries these devices have caused. Just because a procedure is non-surgical, does not mean that it is non-dangerous.

If you have been seriously injured by an energy-based device used for a vaginal rejuvenation procedure, contact Brown & Brothers to learn your options. Brown & Brothers has 20 years of experience specializing in cases of medical negligence. Simply fill out the online form for a free case review.

Sources

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Are U.S.  Hospitals Safe for Mothers During Delivery? https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/08/are-hospitals-safe-for-mothers-during-delivery/ Sat, 04 Aug 2018 03:56:45 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=15762 The United States is often viewed as one of the most innovative and progressive nations in the developed world.  Even with our incredible advances in science and medicine, the question is still raised of if U.S.  hospitals are safe for …

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The United States is often viewed as one of the most innovative and progressive nations in the developed world.  Even with our incredible advances in science and medicine, the question is still raised of if U.S.  hospitals are safe for mothers during delivery? The gravity of the answer to this question may come as a surprise to many readers.

Are U.S.  Hospitals Safe for Mothers During Delivery?

Maternal injury and death rates have been on the decline across developed nations.  France, Germany, and Japan have all successfully reduced injury and death rates, while these rates in the U.S.  continue to climb.  As of 2015, there were an estimated 26.4 injuries or deaths among 100,000 live births in the U.S.  – the highest rate across developed nations.

According to U.S.  News & World Report, each year around 50,000 women suffer severe injuries during the labor and delivery processes.  Around 700 of those women die.  An investigation by USA Today revealed there are two primary complications leading to injury or death – hypertension (high blood pressure) and hemorrhaging (blood loss).  According to the investigation:

  • 60 percent of deaths caused by hypertension presented blood pressure over 160/110.
  • 90 percent of deaths caused by hemorrhaging could have been prevented had healthcare providers taken action sooner.
  • There are standard protocols for managing hypertension during labor and delivery. The standard call for treatment is 60 minutes.  USA Today reported that only 31 hospitals reported following that protocol.  Only nine hospitals reported tracking how often healthcare providers adhere to that timeframe.

The preventable nature of maternal injury and death has been echoed time and again, but still nothing seems to be changing.  A trainer for the American Hospital Association has been quoted saying that “This shouldn’t be happening here”, and that the majority of deaths “were absolutely preventable”.

Suffering a preventable injury or illness, especially in a healthcare setting is devastating physically and emotionally.  For women who are preparing to deliver a child, that devastation is manifest in unimaginable ways.  To learn more about birth injuries, complications, or your rights as a patient, contact Brown & Brothers to speak with one of our attorneys.

Hospital Safety Regulations are Lacking

There are fundamental and deep issues contributing to the consistently high maternal injury and death rates.  As noted previously, a majority of hospitals fail to follow protocols for specific complications that are known to be deadly.  Others fail to diagnose and treat complications in a timely manner.  The issues, however, go much deeper to the legislative and regulatory systems.  Some examples include:

  • The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) do not take an aggressive approach to maternal care in the same way that they aggressively and proactively protect the elderly and Medicare recipients.
  • Medicare does not require hospitals to track complications of childbirth. It does require hospitals to tract complications related to knee and hip surgeries and other procedures.
  • The Joint Commission requires hospitals to track Cesarean section (c-section) procedures, but not incidents where healthcare providers fail to follow guidelines and complications result.

In the U.S., the exception to the rule appears to be California, where very strict safety practices have been instituted.  Endorsed by top medical societies, California’s strict guidelines have resulted in a decline in maternal injury and death rates of almost half.  In fact, their numbers have decreased across the state, even as the overall rates in the U.S.  have continued to rise.

Unfortunately, the measures taken in California have not been followed in most other states.  On a federal level, lawmakers have also been slow to act.  Dr.  David Baker, who is the executive vice president of the Joint Commission’s Division of Health Care Quality Evaluation has been quoted stating that, “for us to make a requirement for every organization to follow something, there has to be a clear national consensus that this is the standard of care” Considering the fact that the U.S.  is falling starkly behind other developed nations, it would seem that this national crisis would be a priority on a nationwide level.

While state and federal governments are hesitant to act, many healthcare systems are taking it upon themselves to address the problem of maternal safety and standardized care.  Currently, 985 hospitals have enrolled in an Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health (AIM) program, which is dedicated to reforming hospital policies and procedures.  The hospitals participating represent only about 40 percent of U.S.  birthing hospitals, however, leaving significant room for improvement.

Safeguarding Your Health and Legal Rights

When you seek medical attention, there is an overall hope that you are safe and can trust the knowledge and training of your healthcare provider.  Unfortunately, healthcare providers, hospitals, and nurses do not always follow protocol or the standards of care.  Such actions are a violation of your legal rights.

If you have questions or concerns about your labor and delivery experience, or you or your child have been diagnosed with an injury you believe could have been prevented, it is important to contact an attorney right away.  You deserve to have your concerns addressed and, if applicable, to pursue the justice and compensation that you deserve.  The team at Brown & Brothers can help, and is here to answer your questions.  Fill out our online form to schedule a free case review.

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Bayer Finally Stopping Sales of Essure Birth Control Device https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/07/bayer-stopping-sales-essure-birth-control-device/ Tue, 31 Jul 2018 01:40:53 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=15753 After more than a decade of injury reports and lawsuits, Bayer is finally stopping sales of the Essure birth control device.  Currently only available in the United States, Essure will no longer be available as of the end of 2018.  …

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After more than a decade of injury reports and lawsuits, Bayer is finally stopping sales of the Essure birth control device.  Currently only available in the United States, Essure will no longer be available as of the end of 2018.  For many readers, this news may seem like a long time coming.  Read on to learn more about the Essure device, the dangers and associated impacts on women, and what you can do to protect your legal rights.

What is the Essure Birth Control Device?

Essure is a birth control device that has been heralded as the only non-surgical sterilization method for women.  The device is made of two nickel-titanium coils, and is small enough to be inserted into the fallopian tube.  Once inserted into the fallopian tube, the body reacts to the device and builds scar tissue, which blocks sperm from reaching the woman’s egg.

According to the Essure website, one Essure device is placed in each fallopian tube.  The procedure to implant the devices is considered minimally-invasive, and can be performed in most doctor’s offices.  Essure is inserted through the vagina and cervix, and does not require surgical incisions.

Essure is advertised as permanent birth control with “no cutting”, “no visible scars”, and covered by many insurance carriers.  Thousands of women trusted the promise of permanent birth control and less side effects than hormonal options.  Unfortunately, the risks associated with Essure have not been given the proper attention needed to keep consumers safe.  What’s more, despite numerous warnings and regulations by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Essure has continued to be offered to women.

Many patients do not realize the obligations that manufacturers have to ensure their products are safe and effective.  If you have been injured by Essure or another medical device that has malfunctioned or is defective, it is important to take action and hold the manufacturer accountable.  Contact Brown & Brothers to learn more about your legal rights.

Numerous Complaints about Dangerous Device

Since Essure was approved in 2002, more than 750,000 women have been implanted with the device.  There have also been tens of thousands of complaints about adverse reactions and side effects.  So many complaints, in fact, that the FDA has warned Bayer and ordered additional testing and studies since that time.

In 2016, the FDA issued a warning about the product, which led to a 70 percent decline in sales.  Unfortunately, it was too late for a significant number of women who trusted the device.  There are currently more than 16,000 women participating in lawsuits against Bayer related to the risks and the fact that many serious risks were not on the packaging.  The original packaging only listed allergic reactions as a possible side effect.  Current packaging (after numerous restrictions and warnings) lists rash, hives, and swelling as well.

More serious risks are included in the FDA labeling, but are not included in the packaging, including headaches, hair loss, mood disorders, and weight gain.  Many women also have reported that they were not warned of the dangers of migration or perforation, or how complicated removal could be if necessary.  Several women have reported having to have a hysterectomy in order to remove the device.

Have Doctors Ignored Recommendations?

Like most medications or medical products, Essure has a list of factors that may make it an inappropriate choice for certain consumers.  Essure is not recommended for:

  • Women who are unsure about permanent birth control
  • Women who are already pregnant, or have been pregnant recently
  • Women who only have one fallopian tube, or have an obstruction in one or both
  • Women who have had a tubal ligation (tubes tied)
  • Women who have unexplained vaginal bleeding
  • Women who are allergic to contrast dye or the materials used to make Essure
  • Women who have cancer of the reproductive organs, or who are suspected to

These factors may impact the effectiveness of Essure, or may contribute to other complications or side effects.  News sources have weighed in on the possibility that doctors were promoting Essure for financial reasons, even if the device was not the best choice for the patient – despite these warnings.  In July 2018, CNN reported that Bayer paid out $2.5 million to 11,850 doctors.  This money was related to consulting and related fees for the product.  While legal, this sort of payment, or incentive, is incredibly controversial and raises the question of whether doctors are influenced by financial gain.

Risks Associated with Essure

If none of the above factors apply and Essure is inserted, then women are at risk for complications during and after the procedure.  These risks have not received as much attention as deserved in order to protect women.  Risks include:

During Procedure:

  • Mild to moderate pain
  • Breakage of the device
  • Perforation of the fallopian tube or uterus
  • Absorption of the salt water solution used for the procedure
  • Side effects associated with local anesthesia

After the Procedure:

  • Mild to moderate pain
  • Cramping in the pelvic area and back
  • Vaginal bleeding
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Expulsion of the device from the body

Long-Term Risks:

  • Acute pain, which may be exacerbated by other gynecological conditions
  • Migration of the device to other parts of the abdomen
  • Allergic reaction to the materials in Essure (stainless steel, nickel, titanium, polyester fibers, silver-tin, and platinum)
  • Unwanted pregnancy (Essure is not considered 100 percent effective. In premarket trials, three out of 503 women became pregnant while Essure was in place)
  • Ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy located in the fallopian tube)
  • Surgery to have the device removed

Protecting Your Health and Legal Rights

It has taken numerous warnings and concerns from the FDA and thousands of lawsuits for Bayer to decide the best course of action is to pull Essure from the market.  The company cites that safety and effectiveness are not factors in their decision – but rather, declining sales.  Even though their product has been shown to have risks and injure patients.

Protecting your health and legal rights is important to you, and to us here at Brown & Brothers.  If you have questions about Essure lawsuits, medical malpractice, or birth injuries, contact us to schedule a free case review.  Fill out our online form, or call us at 1-877-415-6603.

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What are the Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Erb’s Palsy? https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/2018/07/what-are-causes-symptoms-treatment-of-erbs-palsy/ Sat, 21 Jul 2018 19:07:57 +0000 https://www.birthinjuryguide.org/?p=15711 Erb’s palsy is a condition that is often confused with cerebral palsy because both are associated with nerve damage and paralysis.  Though similar, the causes and symptoms of Erb’s palsy are different than those associated with cerebral palsy.  Read on …

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Erb’s palsy is a condition that is often confused with cerebral palsy because both are associated with nerve damage and paralysis.  Though similar, the causes and symptoms of Erb’s palsy are different than those associated with cerebral palsy.  Read on to learn more Erb’s palsy, the causes, symptoms, risk factors, and treatment options.

What are the Types and Causes of Erb’s Palsy?

Erb’s palsy is also known as brachial plexus birth palsy.  This condition is most commonly caused by abnormal or complicated labor and delivery that results in stretching or tearing of the nerves and muscles in the neck.  Such stretching or tearing is often classified as a brachial plexus injury because of the system of nerves in the neck and shoulder by the same name.

The brachial plexus network controls nerves and muscles in the shoulders, arms, elbows, wrists, and hands.  These nerves run from the neck down the spine.  Because of the nature of the injuries leading to Erb’s palsy, the condition is often noticeable immediately or shortly after birth.

During abnormal or complicated labor or delivery, the baby’s head and neck may be pulled to one side in order to pass the shoulders through the birth canal.  In more difficult deliveries, such as feet-first, or if the baby’s head become “stuck” in the birth canal, the person delivering the baby may have to pull harder.  This forceful delivery can put pressure on the arms, shoulders, neck, and head, causing injuries to the nerves.

Depending on the damage done to the brachial plexus nerves, Erb’s palsy may be diagnosed as one of four types.  These types include:

  • Neuropraxia: Also called “stingers” or “burners”, neuropraxia is the most common type of nerve injury. This injury is characterized by stretching of the nerves, but not a tear.  In most cases, neuropraxia heals within three months of the injury with few side effects.
  • Neuroma: A neuroma is a more serious injury, caused by more severe stretching of the nerve fibers. As a neuroma heals, scar tissue can build up along the nerves, which press on tissue and cause discomfort.  A neuroma is more difficult to treat, and long-term recovery is generally only partially successful.
  • Rupture: When nerves stretch to the point of tearing, it is called a rupture injury. Ruptures are severe, and require surgery to repair, or graft, the nerves back together.  Ruptures do not heal on their own.
  • Avulsions: Avulsion is the most serious type of nerve injury. This injury occurs when the nerves are completely torn away from the spinal cord.  When this happens, the damaged nerve cannot be reattached.  The only possible treatment is splicing together nerves from other parts of the body.  The outcome varies.

Risk Factors for Erb’s Palsy

The causes and risk factors for Erb’s palsy are similar, including abnormal or difficult labor or delivery.  There are some additional risk factors that parents should be aware of, however, which may be relevant before labor begins.  These risk factors include:

  • Excessive maternal weight gain during pregnancy
  • Large infant size
  • Gestational diabetes
  • Prolonged second stage of labor (lasting over one hour)
  • Use of assistive birthing tools, such as forceps or vacuum
  • History of difficult births or Erb’s palsy

Sometimes during labor and delivery, complications are unavoidable.  However, many brachial plexus injuries are the result of improper handling of an abnormal or difficult birth.  When doctors use too much force, delay delivery, fail to recognize complications, or improperly use birthing tools, the chances of a birth injury like brachial plexus injuries increases.  If you are concerned that your child’s Erb’s palsy is the result of doctor negligence or recklessness, contact Brown & Brothers today.

What are the Symptoms of Erb’s Palsy?

The symptoms of Erb’s palsy may vary depending on the type and severity of the injury.  The most common symptoms include:

  • Weakness in one arm
  • Holding one arm against the body with a bent elbow
  • Lack of, or decreased grip strength in affected hand
  • Numbness in the arm or hand
  • Impaired muscular, circulatory, or nervous development
  • Paralysis in affected arm (partial or total)
  • Pain on affected side

Every brachial plexus injury is unique, and your child’s overall health will also impact symptoms and their severity.

Treatment Options for Erb’s Palsy

Much like the symptoms, treating Erb’s palsy will depend on the extent of the injury and your child’s overall health.  As a general rule, treatment options will include:

  • Mild Injuries: Most mild stretch or tear injuries will heal on their own without much, if any, medical intervention. In most cases, mild injuries heal within three to six months.
  • Moderate to Severe Injuries: More serious injuries may not heal without assistance. These injuries may require interventions, such as:
    • Physical therapy: Improves mobility and movement, reduces pain, and increases strength
    • Occupational therapy: Improves strength and coordination. Occupational therapy is a very helpful method of improving a child’s ability to function in day-to-day activities, such as holding items, playing, and exercising.
    • Surgery: The most severe cases of Erb’s palsy may require surgical intervention. Surgery is done to repair nerves and restore as much function as possible.  When surgery is necessary, it is best to perform the procedure as soon as possible to improve outcomes.

Talk to your child’s doctor about treatment options that are right for him or her.  With conditions like Erb’s palsy, treatment is often most effective when it includes a team of healthcare providers working together to address all possible factors.

Learn More about Erb’s Palsy

To learn more about Erb’s palsy, visit our Birth Injury Guide topics that are full of information.  If you would like to speak to an attorney about Erb’s palsy caused by medical negligence, fill out our online form to schedule a free case review with one of our attorneys.

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